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(excerpted from chapter 3, page 29)

Routine

Everyone likes a "routine." There is security in the familiar, knowing the what, where and when of things to happen. This is so true for the elderly. They have established routines of daily rituals in personal care, which include grooming, dressing and eating meals, for example; to social activities like going to the park, sitting on the same bench with the same group of folks for a daily chat. These routines have been embedded in their days for many years. They can do their routines without really thinking about them too much, and they don't have to make any "new" decisions. They are secure in their day, feeling safe that they know what is going to happen.

Take away what is routine and familiar and you have a person who is "working without a net," (see page 19). You have now placed them in a situation that requires new attention, new memory and mostly "uncertainty."

Helping to establish and keep a "routine" will facilitate success in their daily activities.

Helping to establish and keep a "routine" will facilitate their orientation. They will become more successful tracking the time of day and day of the week when they have a "routine."

Helping to establish and keep a "routine" reduces restlessness and creates serenity.

How to Communicate with Alzheimer’s - Susan Kohler How to Communicate with Alzheimer’s
Susan Kohler
0-9753165-0-8
April 2004
Spiral Bound
152 pages
$17.95/$23.95 Can.